The Aspie Imagination

The world of the Aspie’s imagination is a wonderful place. An Aspie child can play pretend for hours on end. 

An Aspie does not simply pretend; he/she actually lives the experience. There is no halfway point with the Aspie.

Aspies don’t seem to concentrate much on the dialogue of the pretend game as they are acting it out. They live for the moment. They immerse themselves totally into each movement. They might be playing at sword fighting, but they seem to actually hear the clash of metal on metal. 

Watching an Aspie play is a thing to behold. It leaves some of us feeling a bit envious of their ability to move so completely to another world. 

As I mentioned in a previous post, my Aspie friend, Rachel, taught me to use my imagination more than I was used to. We played role playing games on the bus on the way to and from school. It was a strange world for me. I had no toys and was never encouraged to play more than a bit of baseball in our own yard, or riding my bike up and down the same dirt road. 

All of a sudden, I was on this whirlwind ride to another world! I could say whatever I wanted, create multiple scenarios. It was a wonderful experience!

Rachel had to nudge me into it, however. I never felt free to just be a child. She was patient and understanding in her own way. She didn’t question why I was the way I was; she simply accepted me and the friendship that we were forming. 

Years later, I revealed to her that I had been in an abusive home. When one is put down and hurt for the least of things, they tend to be less willing to come out of their shell. 

Those days on the bus were some of the best of my childhood. I will always be thankful for the friendship that we developed.

Little did I know that my friendship with her would be preparation for dealing with my own little Aspie. When I look at him as he plays, I am once again drawn in and amazed. I think of her at those times and a little smile crosses my face. 

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Posted on June 9, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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